John Galliano

Last night, I was reading about John Galliano in the Vogue from September 2011. It was this photo below which caught my eye, for reasons I’m sure I need not explain. 

Here are two quotes which stuck in my mind since reading the article:

On Amanda Harlech, his muse, ‘Harlech enabled Galliano’s fantasies. “I remember once John wanted a pattern on an organza coat”, recalls Berardi. “Amanda got some eighteenth century pottery which they smashed and sewed into the pockets so it looked like fragments of embroidery”. He was experimenting with cut, rising above that student street-urchin level of “rebellion” says Sarah Mower, contributing editor of American Vogue.’

“He would send me a fax” says Manolo Blahnik, who designed shoes for Galliano’s shows until about 2000. “It would read, ‘There’ a princess from St. Petersburg, she’s broke after the revolution. She’s been surviving on people’s charity and arrives in Scotland. What shoes should she wear?”

And as Vogue writes ‘If there’s one thing this year of revolution has taught us, it’s that things fall apart quickly. It took just six days for John Galliano’s 27-year career in fashion to implode. As a way to mark a life’s work, it was the equivalent of driving a car off a cliff.’

Galliano faces a fine of €10,000 for “public insults based on origin, religious affiliation, race or ethnicity”, not a prison sentence, as was supposedly reported. I did see the mobile phone footage of what originally happened, and as shocking and wrong as it was, I believe its a huge shame for someone as talented, driven and highly regarded amongst his peers. We’re all human, after all. Or maybe we’re not.

A rose-pink fantasia for Dior’s 60th anniversary collection.

Original Photograph by Nick Knight

I took this photo of Vogue September 2010.

‘Les Clochards’ (Tramps) by Christian Dior, Couture Fall/Winter 2001-02

Photograph by Nick Knight 2001

Dress by John Galliano for Christian Dior Haute Couture 

Photograph by Nick Knight

Portrait of John Galliano

Photographer unknown.

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